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NBA Suspends Phoenix Sun owner Robert Sarver for misconduct

Robert Sarver

Phoenix Sun owner and managing partner Robert Sarver has received a suspension of one year and a fine of $10 million from the NBA for creating a bad work environment during his tenure.

Phoenix Sun owner and managing partner Robert Sarver has received a suspension of one year and a fine of $10 million from the NBA for creating a bad work environment during his tenure.

The NBA started an investigation last year on the basis of a report by the ESPN, which claimed that Sarver used to make sexist and racist remarks during the 18 years he had owned the franchise.

A total of 320 people who worked for Sarver with the Suns and the WNBA’s Phoenix Mercury, including former and current employees, were interviewed by the law firm of Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz to come to a decision about the allegations.

The firm also stated that Sarver co-operated fully with the investigation but it held him guilty of those remarks in a report they released on Tuesday.

“Sarver engaged in conduct that clearly violated common workplace standards, as reflected in team and League rules and policies,” the report stated.

“This conduct included the use of racially insensitive language; unequal treatment of female employees; sex related statements and conduct; and harsh treatment of employees that on occasion constituted bullying,” the report further read.

The report stressed on Sarver’s usage of the “N-word” on at least five occasions, and held him guilty for sexually harassing female employees and yelling and cursing at the workers.

Sarver will not be allowed to attend games or practices or be present at any NBA or WNBA offices, arenas or practice facilities during his one year of suspension. In addition to that, he can’t get involved in the teams’ business or basketball operations and can’t take part in any board meetings either.

It is also mandatory for Sarver to take part and complete a training program that focuses on respect and appropriate workplace conduct.

The 60-year-old made his fortune in banking and real estate. Then he went on to become the Suns’ and Mercury’s majority owner in 2004.